Tuesday, January 31, 2017

An Invitation to the Kick off of the IRSC NEA Big Read: "Brother, I'm Dying" by Edwidge Danticat

 An Invitation to the Kick off of the IRSC NEA Big Read: "Brother, I'm Dying" by Edwidge Danticat 



If you live in the Treasure Coast area in Florida, you are cordially invited to the #IRSC NEA Big Read to examine the writings of the award winning novelist Edwidge Danticat

Event: Kick off of the NEA Big Read:

Faculty-Driven Panel Discussion on Edwidge Danticat's book, "Brother, I'm Dying." Dr. Celucien L. Joseph ("Docteur Lou"), Professor of English at Indian River State College and Co-Advisor to the  Haitian Cultural Club at IRSC, will provide an overview of the book.

Where: Indian River State College
(Main Campus in Fort Pierce, Florida)

When: Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Time: 2:30 PM- 3:30 PM

Room #: N 135




*The Faculty-driven panel will provide an introduction to "Brother, I'm Dying" by Edwidge Danticat and a lively discussion on the importance of telling your own stories through creative means and empathizing with the stories of others. Student and community members will also sit on the panel and provide the opportunity for further discussion.

** The first 50 attendees will also receive a free copy of "Brother, I'm Dying."

#BIGREADBROTHERIMDYING
#EDWIDGEDANTICATATIRSC
#BROTHERIMDYING 


Tuesday, January 24, 2017

"This is Your Morning" by Asselin Charles

"This isYour Morning"
by Asselin Charles
Ah, the fluid complexity of personal identity in these post-modern days! Enuma Okoro’s témoignage resonates for so many of us, nomads of the global south. To wit my own experience as a seasoned Haitian émigré:
-- Not once in my more than four decades in North America have I ever been identified as a Haitian, except in context, i. e. when I find myself in a crowd of Haitians or introduced as such by someone who knows me. I am usually asked by strangers whether I am from Africa, whether I'm Nigerian more precisely.  (About three years ago, a Nigerian woman in a downtown Toronto store got very upset with me because she believed I was lying to her by claiming I was not from Nigeria).
-- I spent three years teaching in Nigeria, and I passed so easily (mistaken sometimes for a Yoruba and sometimes for an Ibo) that I often had to protest and insist that I was a foreigner. I remember once I had to  proffer my passport to a Nigerian couple who really believed I was pulling their legs by claiming I was from the Caribbean.
-- A few years ago I spent a week in Haiti on an academic mission. As I am wont to do when I am in the tropics, I wore either a traditional Chinese shirt or a traditional Nigerian or Ghanaian shirt every day at the office. It was only on the fourth day of my stay that the receptionist blurted that she had mistaken me for a visitor from Africa based on my clothing, my body language (!), and my accent (this one was strange, given that I greeted everyone in my native Kreyòl).
-- Although my command of Mandarin Chinese (guo yu) is elementary at best, really just the  survival Chinese I mastered over my four years living in Taiwan, although as a Black man I really stand out in Taiwan or China, I feel more at home on the streets of Taipei than I do on the streets of Port-au-Prince.
-- I crave traditional Taiwanese food as often as I crave Haitian food.
-- Must be something my Taiwanese friends see in me. Culturally and racially I am clearly not Chinese, yet I remember two occasions when Taiwanese friends exclaimed to me, “Oh, you’re so Chinese, Asselin!”
-- Like most Haitians I was raised a Catholic, yet I thrill more to the esthetics and spiritual atmosphere of a Daoist temple than to the old ritual of the mass in a Catholic church, more drawn to Matsu than to Mary.
-- Haitians, and Haitian intellectuals in particular, are in love with the French language; they literally get high speaking and listening to it. But I prefer the cadence and sonority of  English and thrill more to Shakespeare’s iambic pentameter than to Racine’s alexandrin.
Am I still Haitian? Sure, in a way, faithful to my Haitian background just as Ernest Dowson was faithful to Cynara ("I have been faithful to thee, Cynara, in my fashion."-- From Ernest Dowson's poem "Non Sum Qualis Eram Bonae sub Regno Cynarae"). And in many complex ways I am also American, and French, and Chinese, and Nigerian, and Canadian, and Asgardian… How about you?

Thursday, January 19, 2017

NEA Big Read: IRSC Reads Brother, I'm Dying: Calendar of Events









"What’s Your Story?
IRSC’s NEA Big Read: Brother, I’m Dying, by Edwidge Danticat

Indian River State College will hold events in support of the award of a National Endowment for the Arts Big Read grant in the Spring 2017 semester. Students, staff, and community members will have the chance to attend events structured around Edwidge Danticat’s brilliantly written memoir Brother, I’m Dying, which chronicles the author’s life in Haiti and the United States, and her close relationships with her uncle and father.  

Themes include health care, family connections, and immigration, and will lead readers to consider larger questions: How do you tell your own story? How do you listen and empathize with the stories of others?

Tuesday, January 3 at the Hobe Sound Public Library of the Martin County Library System
Book Club
Hobe Sound Public Library, 1 p.m.
This group meets the first Tuesday afternoon of each month. Join them on January 3 as the group discusses Brother, I'm Dying. http://martin.evanced.info/signup/EventDetails?eventid=2600

Wednesday, January 4 at the Lakewood Park Branch of the St. Lucie County Library System
Lakewood Park  Book Discussion Group
St. Lucie County Public Library, 3 p.m.
This group meets the first Wednesday afternoon of each month. Join them on January 4 as the group discusses Brother, I'm Dying. All Library discussions are open to the public and offered at no charge. A limited number of Library copies of each selection are available for checkout on a first-come, first-served basis in print or as e-books. http://stlucieco.gov/departments-services/a-z/community-services/library/book-discussion-groups

Week of January 30

January 31st at 12:30 pm at the Pavilion on Main Campus (the Gazebo area in front of the Library)
NEA Big Read & Just Read, Florida!
Danticat Block Party
Join IRSC Libraries, CCG, and other Indian River State College departments for an introduction to IRSC’s NEA Big Read title Brother, I’m Dying, and the Just Read! Florida Initiative’s Krik? Krak! Learn more about Haiti with cultural performances, food, and activities, and learn about all the different ways you can join in the NEA Big Read events throughout the months of February and March.  
The first 50 attendees will also receive a free copy of Brother, I’m Dying.

February 1st at 2:30 pm in N135 on Main Campus
What’s Your Story? An Introduction to the IRSC NEA Big Read
Main Campus
Indian River State College kicks off the NEA Big Read grant period with a faculty-driven panel that will provide an introduction to Brother, I’m Dying by Edwidge Danticat and a lively discussion on the importance of telling your own stories through creative means and empathizing with the stories of others. Student and community panelists will also sit on the panel and provide the opportunity for further discussion.
Week of February 6
Pictorial Exhibition and Jour des Aieux Oral History Project: Main Campus
Visit the Library this week to check out the Pictorial Exhibition and be a part of our Jour des Aieux Oral History Project, powered by StoryCorps. We’ll provide questions (and space!) for you to interview a friend or classmate about their families and stories for inclusion in the #IRSCReadsDanticat collection. Don’t have a partner? Come and we’ll take care of the rest!

Week of February 13
Pictorial Exhibition and Jour des Aieux Oral History Project: Pruitt Campus
Visit the Library this week to check out the Pictorial Exhibition and be a part of our Jour des Aieux Oral History Project, powered by StoryCorps. We’ll provide questions (and space!) for you to interview a friend or classmate about their families and stories for inclusion in the #IRSCJourdesAieux collection. Don’t have a partner? Come and we’ll take care of the rest!

Tuesday, February 14
Book Discussion Prima Vista Site, Port Saint Lucie, 12:00-1:00 p.m.
Join IRSC in a book discussion for the NEA Big Read at the Pruitt Prima Vista Campus! All are welcome. Attendees will also have the opportunity to add their own story to the Jour des Aieux Oral History Project.

Wednesday, February 15
Book Discussion Pruitt Campus at 8:15 a.m.
Location: Schreiber Center
Join IRSC in a book discussion for the NEA Big Read at the Pruitt Campus! All are welcome. Attendees will also have the opportunity to add their own story to the Jour des Aieux Oral History Project.

Thursday, February 16
Book Discussion Prima Vista Site, Port Saint Lucie
Join IRSC in a book discussion for the NEA Big Read at the Pruitt Prima Vista Campus! All are welcome. Attendees will also have the opportunity to add their own story to the Jour des Aieux Oral History Project.
Week of February 20
Pictorial Exhibition and Jour des Aieux Oral History Project: Dixon Hendry Campus
Visit the Library this week to check out the Pictorial Exhibition and be a part of our Jour des Aieux Oral History Project, powered by StoryCorps. We’ll provide questions (and space!) for you to interview a friend or classmate about their families and stories for inclusion in the #IRSCReadsDanticat collection. Don’t have a partner? Come and we’ll take care of the rest!

Thursday, February 23
Book Discussion Pruitt Campus at 12:30pm
Location: TBA
Join IRSC in a book discussion for the NEA Big Read at the Pruitt Campus! All are welcome. Attendees will also have the opportunity to add their own story to the Jour des Aieux Oral History Project.
Week of February 27
Pictorial Exhibition and Jour des Aieux Oral History Project: Chastain Campus
Visit the Library this week to check out the Pictorial Exhibition and be a part of our Jour des Aieux Oral History Project, powered by StoryCorps. We’ll provide questions (and space!) for you to interview a friend or classmate about their families and stories for inclusion in the #IRSCReadsDanticat collection. Don’t have a partner? Come and we’ll take care of the rest!

Friday, March 3
Book Discussion Chastain Campus
A101, 12:00-1:00 p.m.
Join IRSC in a book discussion for the NEA Big Read at the Chastain Campus! All are welcome. Attendees will also have the opportunity to add their own story to the Jour des Aieux Oral History Project.

Week of March 6

Pictorial Exhibition and Jour des Aieux Oral History Project: Mueller Campus
Visit the Mueller Campus this week to check out the Pictorial Exhibition and be a part of our Jour des Aieux Oral History Project, powered by StoryCorps. We’ll provide questions (and space!) for you to interview a friend or classmate about their families and stories for inclusion in the #IRSCReadsDanticat collection. Don’t have a partner? Come and we’ll take care of the rest!

Thursday, March 2 at the Port St. Lucie Branch of the St. Lucie County Library System
Lakewood Park  Book Discussion Group
St. Lucie County Public Library, 3 p.m.
This group meets the first Thursday afternoon of each month. Join them on March 2 as the group discusses Brother, I'm Dying. All Library discussions are open to the public and offered at no charge. A limited number of Library copies of each selection are available for checkout on a first-come, first-served basis in print or as e-books. http://stlucieco.gov/departments-services/a-z/community-services/library/book-discussion-groups

Thursday, March 2 at the Fort Pierce Branch of the St. Lucie County Library System
Fort Pierce Branch Thursday Evening Book Discussion Group
St. Lucie County Public Library, First Floor Meeting Room 6 p.m.
This group meets the first Thursday of each month. Join them on March 2 as the group discusses Brother, I'm Dying. All Library discussions are open to the public and offered at no charge. A limited number of Library copies of each selection are available for checkout on a first-come, first-served basis in print or as e-books. http://stlucieco.gov/departments-services/a-z/community-services/library/book-discussion-groups

Tuesday,  March 7
Book Discussion Mueller Campus
Richardson Center, 1 p.m.- 4 p.m.
Join IRSC in a book discussion for the NEA Big Read at the Mueller Campus! All are welcome. Attendees will also have the opportunity to add their own story to the Jour des Aieux Oral History Project.

Wednesday, March 8
Book Discussion Mueller Campus
Brackett Library, 5 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Join IRSC in a book discussion for the NEA Big Read at the Mueller Campus! All are welcome. Attendees will also have the opportunity to add their own story to the Jour des Aieux Oral History Project.  

Week of March 20
Pictorial Exhibition and Jour des Aieux Oral History Project: Tomeu Center and Blackburn, Main Campus
Visit the Tomeu Center this week to check out the Pictorial Exhibition and be a part of our Jour des Aieux Oral History Project, powered by StoryCorps. We’ll provide questions (and space!) for you to interview a friend or classmate about their families and stories for inclusion in the #IRSCReadsDanticat collection. Don’t have a partner? Come and we’ll take care of the rest!

Book Discussion Main Campus Monday, March 20, 2017
Miley Library, 8:00 am - 9:30 am
L220 Join IRSC in a book discussion for the NEA Big Read at the Main Campus! All are welcome.

Book Discussion Main Campus Tuesday, March 21, 2017
Miley Library, 8:00 am - 3:30 pm
L220
Join IRSC in a book discussion for the NEA Big Read at the Main Campus!
Stones in the Sun: A Community Film Viewing
Thursday, March 23
V110, 2:30 p.m.
Join IRSC’s Fielden Institute for Lifelong Learning in a showing of Stones in the Sun, a film written and produced by Patricia Benoit that highlights the struggles a family faced when they emigrated from Haiti to New York City.

Week of March 26
Monday, March 27
V110, 1 p.m.
Create Dangerously: An Afternoon with Edwidge Danticat
Join award winning author Edwidge Danticat for a lecture on Brother, I’m Dying and the creative process during the closing event of the IRSC’s NEA Big Read program! Danticat’s numerous awards include a 1999 American Book Award, a 2011 Langston Hughes Medal, and a 2009 MacArthur Genius Grant. "

Source: http://irsc.libguides.com/neabigread/events

Edwidge Danticat at Indian River State College (#IRSC): Calendar of Events

Edwidge Danticat at Indian River State College (#IRSC):Calendar of Events

If you live in the Treasure Coast area and its surrounding, Indian River State College (Fort Pierce, Florida) is hosting a number of events--10 in total-- on the brilliant memoir, "Brother, I'm Dying" by the prominent Haitian-born novelist Edwidge Danticat. These series of events, based on the highlighted text, will take place throughout this academic Spring semester, 2017. 
 

 
For example, consider attending one of the informative and thrilling events:


January 31st at 12:30 pm at the Pavilion on Main Campus (the Gazebo area in front of the Library)

NEA Big Read & Just Read, Florida!

Danticat Block Party

Join IRSC Libraries, CCG, and other Indian River State College departments for an introduction to IRSC’s NEA Big Read title Brother, I’m Dying, and the Just Read! Florida Initiative’s Krik? Krak! Learn more about Haiti with cultural performances, food, and activities, and learn about all the different ways you can join in the NEA Big Read events throughout the months of February and March.

The first 50 attendees will also receive a free copy of Brother, I’m Dying.

February 1st at 2:30 pm in N135 on Main Campus

What’s Your Story? An Introduction to the IRSC NEA Big Read

Main Campus

Indian River State College kicks off the NEA Big Read grant period with a faculty-driven panel that will provide an introduction to Brother, I’m Dying by Edwidge Danticat and a lively discussion on the importance of telling your own stories through creative means and empathizing with the stories of others. Student and community panelists will also sit on the panel and provide the opportunity for further discussion.

Monday, March 27

V110, 1 p.m.

Create Dangerously: An Afternoon with Edwidge Danticat

Join award winning author Edwidge Danticat for a lecture on Brother, I’m Dying and the creative process during the closing event of the IRSC’s NEA Big Read program! Danticat’s numerous awards include a 1999 American Book Award, a 2011 Langston Hughes Medal, and a 2009 MacArthur Genius Grant.



For more information, click on the link below to view the calendar of events relating to "Brother, I'm Dying"


http://irsc.libguides.com/neabigread/events

Should you have any questions about this program, do not hesitate to contact Dr. Celucien L. Joseph ("Doctor Lou") @ cjoseph@irsc.edu,

Sincerely,
Celucien L. Joseph, PhD
Professor of English
Department of English/Modern Languages/Communication
Indian River State
Fort Pierce, Florida
cjoseph@irsc.edu

Monday, January 2, 2017

Texte de Dr. Rosalvo Bobo pour le centenaire d'Haïti! (1903)


 
 Texte de Dr.  Rosalvo Bobo pour le centenaire d'Haïti! (1903)
 
 Le docteur Rosalvo Bobo (1873-1929) fut un politicien et un seigneur de guerre qui a joué un rôle de premier plan dans les affaires haïtiennes, jusqu'à l'occupation américaine de 1915. Au moment du débarquement des marines, il était "le chef reconnu de la révolution" qui venait de renverser le gouvernement du président Sam, et, suivant la tradition, le favori dans la course à la présidence. Mais l'amiral William Caperton, chef des troupes d'occupation, l'écarta comme ennemi des Etats-Unis, au profit du sénateur Sudre Dartiguenave. - See more at: http://lenouvelliste.com/lenouvelliste/article/142018/Texte-de-Rosalvo-Bobo-pour-le-centenaire-dHaiti#sthash.at7yGTMB.dpuf
 
 

 

Texte de Rosalvo Bobo pour le centenaire d'Haïti!

Le docteur Rosalvo Bobo (1873-1929) fut un politicien et un seigneur de guerre qui a joué un rôle de premier plan dans les affaires haïtiennes, jusqu'à l'occupation américaine de 1915. Au moment du débarquement des marines, il était "le chef reconnu de la révolution" qui venait de renverser le gouvernement du président Sam, et, suivant la tradition, le favori dans la course à la présidence. Mais l'amiral William Caperton, chef des troupes d'occupation, l'écarta comme ennemi des Etats-Unis, au profit du sénateur Sudre Dartiguenave. - See more at: http://lenouvelliste.com/lenouvelliste/article/142018/Texte-de-Rosalvo-Bobo-pour-le-centenaire-dHaiti#sthash.at7yGTMB.dpuf
 
De Dr. Lewis Ampidu Clormeus
​Bonjour, aujourd’hui nous invite à remémorer les sacrifices des pères de la patrie. Nous leur consacrons un jour spécial selon le voeu de notre Constitution. Mais cette fête nationale a-t-elle encore de la valeur à nos yeux? Quelle signification donnons-nous aux sacrifices de ces héros? Nous agissons souvent comme s’il s’agit d’un simple jour de repos gracieusement concédé par le gouvernement après les festivités de la fin d’année. C’est, pour certains, le moment de bien manger en bonne compagnie selon une tradition assez vieille. Que reste-t-il de la mémoire de cette fête des aïeux qui pourrait consolider notre peuple? Réfléchissons… Osons réfléchir!


​Voici un texte publié par le Dr Rosalvo Bobo, en 1903, à propos de la fête du Centenaire!  100 ans apres, nous nous disons la meme chose!   Mais quel texte!   BRAVO!



"Haïtiens, vous parlez de fêter le centenaire de votre Liberté. Ce n’est vraiment pas ingénieux comme trouvaille d’occasion de nouvelles fantasmagories.
Je suis fatigué, ô mes compatriotes, de nos stupidités.
Faisons grâce au monde, qui nous sait exister, de caricatures révoltantes.
Un peu de vergogne, voyons, à défaut de grandeur morale.
Centenaire de notre liberté ? Non.
Centenaire de l’esclavage du nègre par le nègre.
Centenaire de nos égarements, de nos bassesses et, au milieu de vanités incessantes, de notre rétrocession systématique. Centenaire de nos haines fraternelles, de notre triple impuissance morale, sociale et politique.
Centenaire de nos entr’assassinats dans nos villes et savanes.
Centenaire de nos vices, de nos crimes politiques.
Centenaire de tout ce qu’il peut y avoir de plus odieux au sein d’un groupement d’hommes.
Centenaire de la ruine d’un pays par la misère et la saleté.
Centenaire de l’humiliation et de la déchéance peut-être définitive de la race noire, par la fraction haïtienne, cela s’entend.

Je vous en prie, n’allons pas profaner les noms de ceux-là que nous appelons aussi pompeusement que bêtement NOS AÏEUX. C’est assez d’être traîtres, n’allons pas à l’imposture.
Voyons, mes amis, un peu de calme et de conscience.
Puisque nous avons cent ans, que sommes-nous ?
C’est une vieille prétention de croire que nous sommes quelque chose aux yeux du monde civilisé

Eh bien, NON !
Il faut se placer en pleine Europe pour se faire une idée de notre petitesse.
Petit lieu lointain habité par des nègres.
Les plus curieux savent que nous avons une légère teinte de civilisation française.
Quelle faveur!
L’immense reste se contente de nous savoir sauvages.
Entre nous, quand j’entends ces mots “Peuple haïtien”, “Nation haïtienne”, il se produit en moi un débordement d’ironie.
Non, mes amis, “des groupes, des individus isolés régis par un groupe stigmatisé, du nom de GOUVERNEMENT”.

Et comme, au point de vue de la chose commune, nous avons, par suite de graves dislocations dans le groupement primitif, des intérêts, des goûts, des idées, des idéals différents, nous en sommes à vivre chacun comme dans un désert, ne pouvant pas compter sur les forces sociales et politiques, puisque la société et la politique n’existent plus.
La masse peut passer d’un moment à l’autre. Que lui importe d’être fauve, elle ne tient pas à elle-même. L’individu a à se défendre contre la masse. Vive et soit bien qui peut.Mais, attention !
Affiches autour de cette monstrueuse et fatale caricature, guipures du pagne : RÉPUBLIQUE, CHAMBRES, CONSTITUTIONS, LOIS .

Ah! Le mal de la France! Ce doit être un plaisir pour l’orang-outang de rappeler la bête humaine !
Allons ! Rapprochons-nous davantage et causons. Comme on doit le faire en famille, sans scrupule, sans forfanterie. Ceux d’entre nous qui ont appris à lire un peu dans les grands livres se croient du coup grands. Les belles choses les émerveillent. Et avec un enthousiasme le plus souvent mercantile, ils se mettent, au fur et à mesure qu’ils tournent les pages, à plaquer des grandeurs artificielles sur notre petitesse immuable. Hélas! Petitesse de nos misérables cerveaux !
Venons-en donc décidément à nous persuader que nous sommes des gens d’en bas, des apprentis capables de besognes déterminées. Nos petitesses uniformes seraient si admirables ! Le génie chez le grand est remplacé par la vanité chez le petit. Avouons que nous avons besoin tout au moins d’un peu d’intelligence à défaut de génie.

Et résignons-nous à l’humiliation d’en demander l’aumône aux riches cerveaux de l’humanité d’en haut. Et que mesurons-nous à l’étalon de la moralité ? Maisons publiques, maisons officielles? Bourbiers ! Les plus malins, verrats embusqués dans des formes humaines, en émergent avec quelques paillettes d’or. Mais le sentiment du beau nous faisant défaut, nous n’en savons pas user. Et nous sommes depuis cent ans des jouisseurs avides. Des immoraux, des pédants, des orgueilleux !
Par conséquent, des niais et des réfractaires, voilà ce que nous sommes ! Ayons le courage, l’heure est venue, de nous dénoncer tels à nous- mêmes. Et le 1er janvier 1904, s’il faut quand même faire quelque chose, au lieu de semer les lauriers sur les mânes introuvés de nos aïeux, après avoir passé un siècle à les oublier, à les souiller, à nous moquer outrageusement de leur héroïsme ; au lieu du pourpre et des flammes, nous tendrons un deuil d’un bout à l’autre du pays, en témoignage de notre remords et, la bouche contre terre, tenant chacun un bout de crêpe pendant au drapeau bicolore, nous demanderons pardon à Dessalines, à Toussaint, à Capois, à toute la phalange immortelle de notre histoire.
Pardon de notre ingratitude, de notre esclavage, malgré eux. Pardon de nos folies. Pardon de nos parjures et de notre croupissement. Et nos pleurs plairont mieux à ces dieux que les fêtes bêtes, déloyales et scandaleuses, qu’à contrecoeur, par fausse pudeur, nous nous évertuons à leur préparer. Non. Je proteste de toute la force de mon âme. Nous ne fêterons pas, parce que, pour bâcler ces fêtes, étant misérables, chétifs, sans le sou, il nous faudra encore fouiller dans la bourse du paysan et faire manger au peuple la dernière vache maigre.

Nous ne fêterons pas, parce que, tandis qu’au palais, dans nos salons somptueux, nous viderions la coupe au vin d’or et chanterions ivrogneusement l’an sacré 1804, ce paysan dépouillé, ce peuple miséreux pourrait le maudire. Et leurs malédictions en feraient sortir d’autres du sein de la terre. Eh bien donc, un peu de vergogne et travaillons à sortir du stupre de tout un siècle.

Et s’il nous plaît de commencer bientôt, 1904 ne sera la fête de rien du tout, mais la première année d’existence d’une collectivité de braves gens nègres travaillant modestement et moralement à être un peuple. Et la petite république d’Haïti pourra être une immensité en pleine Europe !
Et le vieux continent pourra se préoccuper, en l’an 2004, du premier centenaire de la GRANDE LIBERTÉ du PEUPLE HAÏTIEN !
Indignez-vous enfin!"

Sunday, January 1, 2017

Haiti: Then and Now: The Top 20 Most-Read Posts and Articles in 2016

Haiti: Then and Now:  The Top 20 Most-Read Posts and Articles in 2016



  1. Review of "Paramilitarism and the Assault on Democracy in Haiti" by Matthew Davidson 
  2.  Haiti, the Archive, and the Historical Imagination by Brandon Byrd
  3.  Haiti: Then and Now Welcomes Jean Eddy Saint Paul, PhD 
  4.  Haiti and the Americas Reviewed by Tammie Jenkins
  5.  On Intellectual Reparations: Hegel, Franklin Tavarès, Susan Buck-Morss, Revolutionary Haiti, and Caribbean Philosophical Association (CPA) 
  6.  Between History and Myth: Three Perspectives on the Role ofReligion in Haiti’s National History and the Haitian Revolution
  7. Ce que nous pouvons apprendre de Moise Jean Charles par Boaz Anglade 
  8.  Ouragan sur Haïti. Lettre ouverte à l'écrivain Makenzy Orcel:De Haïti à Israël : la mémoire de l'esclavage par M. Dominique Blumenstihl-Roth  
  9. Indian River State College (IRSC) Reads: Edwidge Danticat
  10.  Recommended Reading Lists: Haiti (The Haitian Revolution), the Caribbean, and Black Internationalism
  11.  A Plea for Consistent Haitian Solidarity and Social Activism in the Haitian Diaspora
  12.  Jean Price-Mars and the Future of Haiti in the Twenty-first Century: On Haitian Solidarity, and the Renewal and Reconstruction  of the Haitian society
  13.  Vodou, I remember: Two New Books on Haitian Vodou
  14.  Brief Reflections on The Crisis of the Haitian Public Intellectual
  15.  Vodou and Other Religions: Religion, Religious Affiliation, and Haitian National Identity
  16.  Haiti: Then and Now Welcomes Glodel Mezillas, PhD
  17.  Introducing Hope Outreach Productions (HOP), LCC.
  18.  Haitian Writers Series (to be published by Hope Outreach Productions): Call for Contributors 
  19.   The Top 15 Most-Read Haiti: Then and Now Articles of 2015
  20.  How to help Hurricane Matthew Victims in Haiti by Dr. Bertin Louis, Jr.