Tuesday, December 29, 2015

The Top 15 Most-Read Haiti: Then and Now Articles of 2015

 The Top 15 Most-Read Haiti: Then and Now  Articles of 2015






1.        Haitian Intellectuals and the U.S. Occupation of Haiti: An Interview with Patrick Bellegarde-Smith  by Brandon Byrd   

2.      APPEL A LA MOBILISATION CITOYENNE by Jhon Byron 

3.      Haiti: Puer Aeternus? by Edwin BCK Magloire 



5.      Haiti:  Then and Now Interviews  Professor Gershom Williams Conducted by Dr. Celucien L. Joseph


7.      The Colonized Church: Jacques Roumain,  and The Failure of the Christian  Church in the Era of the American Occupation in Haiti (Part  4)  by Celucien L. Joseph 


8.      [1]Dominican Republic: Haitians Strike Back on Independence Day  by Dady Chery 

9.      "Haiti: Five Years After" by Myriam J. A. Chancy

compiled by Lisa Marie Pierre 





14.   Pensée impériale by Michel-Ange Cadet


by Brandon Byrd



Call for Papers: Between Two Worlds: Jean Price-Mars, Haiti, and Africa

Call for Papers: Between Two Worlds: Jean Price-Mars, Haiti, and Africa
Edited by Celucien L. Joseph, PhD

Jean Price-Mars (1876 – 1969), Haitian physician, ethnographer, diplomat, educator, historian, politician, was a towering intellectual in Haitian history and cultural studies, and a Pan Africanist who called to reevaluate the contributions of Africa in universal civilizations and to revalorize African retentions and cultural practices in the Black diaspora, especially on Haitian soil. Through his writings, Price-Mars, whom Leopold Sedar Senghor called “the Father of Negritude,” sought to establish connecting links between Africa and the Black Diaspora, and the shared history and struggle between people of African descent in the Diaspora.
For many scholars, Price-Mars is the father of Haitian ethnology and Dean of Haitian Studies in the twentieth-century, and arguably, the most influential Haitian thinker that has graced the “Black Republic” since the death of Joseph Auguste Anténor Firmin in 1911. In Haitian thought, Price-Mars has exercised an enduring intellectual and ideological influence on the young Haitian intellectuals and writers of the generation of the American Occupation in Haiti (1915-1934) and the post-Occupation culture from the 1930s to 1970s. He is especially known for launching a cultural nationalism and an anti-imperial movement against the brutal American military forces in Haiti.

The writings of Price-Mars were instrumental in challenging the Haitian intellectual of his leadership role in the Haitian society, and in promoting national consciousness and unity among Haitians of all social classes and against their American oppressor. Comparatively, his work was a catalyst in the process of shaping and reshaping Haitian cultural identity and reconsidering the viability of the Afro-Haitian faith of Vodou as religion among the so-called World religions. His thought anticipated what is known today as postcolonialism and decolonization.

Moreover, scholars have also identified Price-Mars as the Francophone counterpart of W.E.B. Du Bois for his activism, scholarly rigor, leadership efficiency, and his unremitting efforts to challenge Western racial history, ideology, and white supremacy in the modern world. Unapologetically, Price-Mars challenged the doctrine of white supremacy and the ideological construction of Western history by demonstrating the equality and dignity of the races and all people, and their achievements in the human historical narrative. As Du Bois, he was a transdisciplinary scholar, boundary-crosser, and cross-cultural theorist; in an unorthodox way, he had brought in conversation various disciplines including anthropology, ethnography, geography, sociology, history, religion, philosophy, race theory, and literature to study the human condition and the most pressing issues facing the nations and peoples of the world, as well as the possible implications they may bear upon us in the postcolonial moment.

"Between Two Worlds: Jean Price-Mars, Haiti, and Africa" is a special volume on Jean Price-Mars that reassesses the importance of his thought and legacy, and the implications of his ideas in the twenty-first century’s culture of political correctness, the continuing challenge of race and racism, and imperial hegemony in the modern world. Price-Mars’s thought is also significant for the renewed scholarly interests in Haiti and Haitian Studies in North America, and the meaning of contemporary Africa in the world today. This volume explores various dimensions in Price-Mars’ thought and his role as medical doctor, historian, anthropologist, cultural critic, public intellectual, politician, pan-Africanist, and humanist.

Hence, the goal of this book is fourfold: 1) The book will explore the contributions of Price-Mars to Haitian history, thought, culture, literature, politics, education, health, etc., 2) This volume will investigate the complex relationships between Haiti and the Dominican Republic in Price-Mars’ historical writings, 3) It studies Price-Mars’ engagement with Western history and the problem of the “racist narrative,” and 4) Finally, the book will highlight Price-Mars’ contributions to Postcolonialism, Africana Studies, and Pan-Africanism.

If you would like to contribute a book chapter to this important volume, along with your CV, please submit a 300 word abstract by Monday, February 29, 2016, to Dr. Celucien Joseph @ celucienjoseph@gmail.com
Successful applicants will be notified of acceptance in the first week of April, 2016. We are looking for original and unpublished essays for this book. Translations of Price-Mars’ works in the English language are also welcome. Potential topics to be addressed include (but are not limited to) the following:

I. Price-Mars as Historian
• Price-Mars as Historian
• Price-Mars’ engagement with Western history
• Price-Mars’ interpretation of Haitian history
• The function of Haitian heroes and heroines in Price-Mars historical writings
• The Origin (s) and History of Haiti and Dominican Republic in Price-Mars’ works
• Particularism and Universalism in Price-Mars’ historical writings

II. Price-Mars as Cultural Critic and Public Intellectual in Haitian Society
• Price-Mars as cultural theorist and literary critic
• The role of Price-Mars’ thought in the Haitian Renaissance in the first half of the twentieth-century
• Price-Mars and the Crisis of Haitian Intellectuals
• Price-Mars and the Crisis of Haitian bourgeoisie-elite
• Price-Mars, Vodou, and the Haitian culture
• The Haitian peasant in the writings of Price-Mars
• The Education of the Haitian masses in the writings of Price-Mars
• The problem of Race in Price-Mars’ writings
• Haitian Women in the thought of Price-Mars
• Price-Mars’ contributions as Medical doctor in Haitian society.

III. Price-Mars as Politician
• The Political career and goals of Jean Price-Mars
• Price-Mars, Haiti’s Ambassador to the nations
• Price-Mars and the American occupation and American imperialism
• The political philosophy and democratic ideas of Price-Mars
• Nationalism and Patriotism in Price-Mars’ thought

IV. Price-Mars as Pan-Africanist
• African history or the meaning of Africa in the writings of Price-Mars
• The Black Diaspora in the thought of Price-Mars
• Price-Mars’ Postcolonial Rhetoric and Linguistic Strategy
• The Vindication and Rehabilitation of the Black Race
• The Role and Contributions of Pre-colonial African civilizations to world civilizations
• Price-Marsian Negritude or Blackness

About the editor

Dr. Celucien L. Joseph is currently an Assistant Professor of English at Indian River State College. He received his Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Texas at Dallas, where he studied Literary Studies and Intellectual History. Professor Joseph also holds an M.A. in French language and literature from the University of Louisville. In addition, he holds degrees in theological and religious studies. He serves in the editorial board and Chair of The Journal of Pan African Studies Regional Advisory Board; he also the curator  of “Haiti: Then and Now.” He edited JPAS special issue on Wole Soyinka entitled “Rethinking Wole Soyinka: 80 Years of Protracted Engagement” (2015). Dr. Joseph is interested in the intersections of literature, history, race, religion, theology, and history of ideas.

Professor Joseph is the author of several books including Race, Religion, and the Haitian Revolution: Essays on Faith, Freedom, and Decolonization (2012), From Toussaint to Price-Mars: Rhetoric, Race, and Religion in Haitian Thought (2013), Haitian Modernity and Liberative Interruptions: Discourse on Race, Religion, and Freedom (2013), God Loves Haiti (2015). He has also contributed several encyclopedia entries and scholarly articles in various journals. His forthcoming book is entitled Thinking in Public: Faith, Secular Humanism, and Development in Jacques Roumain (Wipf and Stock Publishers, 2016). He is the lead editor of a forthcoming two volume anthology entitled Vodou in Haitian Memory: The Idea and Representation of Vodou in Haitian Imagination (Collection 1), and Vodou in the Haitian Experience: A Black Atlantic Perspective (Collection 2)—to be published by Lexington Books in 2016. He is currently working on a volume on Jean-Bertrand Aristide, former President of Haiti and Catholic-Priest Liberation Theology entitled Aristide: A Theological and Political Introduction (under contract with Fortress Press).

Sincerely,
Celucien L. Joseph, PhD
Assistant Professor of English
Indian River State College
Curator of “Haiti: Then and Now”
http://www.haitithenandnowhtn.com/


Sunday, December 6, 2015

"Haiti: Then and Now" Welcomes Ronald Charles!

"Haiti: Then and Now" Welcomes Ronald Charles!

Ronald Charles, PhD
 
Ronald Charles is Assistant Professor at St. Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, Nova Scotia. He earned his PhD in Early Christianity from the University of Toronto. He is the author of Paul and the Politics of Diaspora (Fortress Press, 2014), and Traductions bibliques créoles et préjugés linguistiques (l'Harmattan, 2016).

Research Interests: 
Interdisciplinary study of Christian literature (canonical and extra-canonical), Pauline literature, Second Temple Jewish History and literature, Postcolonial and Diaspora Studies, Method and Theory in the academic study of Religion. 


Sunday, November 8, 2015

APPEL A LA MOBILISATION CITOYENNE by Jhon Byron




APPEL A LA MOBILISATION CITOYENNE
 
"Quand le gouvernement viole les droits du peuple, l'insurrection est pour le peuple, et pour chaque portion du peuple, le plus sacré des droits et le plus indispensable des devoirs".
Article 35, Déclaration des droits de l'homme et du citoyen, 1793.

Depuis environ trois décennies, les composantes principales et essentielles de la population haïtienne, les travailleurs-travailleuses, les paysans-paysannes, les différentes catégories socioprofessionnelles (enseignants, travailleurs de la santé, avocats, petits commerçants etc…), les masses rurales et urbaines se battent pour maintenir une présence active sur la scène politique, notamment à travers la participation aux élections. Cette présence active traduit surtout leur engagement pour l'amélioration des conditions d'existence, leur combat contre la concentration excessive des richesses aux mains d'une minorité qui fait d'Haïti la société la plus inégalitaire de toutes les Amériques.

L'obsession des groupes oligarchiques, du pouvoir actuel et de ses tuteurs internationaux, pour priver le peuple haïtien de sa capacité de choisir ses dirigeants politiques en intoxiquant l'opinion publique avec la médiatisation de certains sondages, en organisant des fraudes massives aux dernières élections et en réprimant la contestation populaire des résultats électoraux fabriqués, est une tentative pour maintenir à tout prix le statu quo politique et socio-économique.

Actuellement, une course de vitesse est lancée pour continuer à jouir des privilèges, dilapider les ressources du pays et reproduire le cercle infernal de l'exclusion? Cela va donc au-delà de la question des résultats publiés par un CEP aux mains des ennemis du peuple: le parti au pouvoir, les clans oligarchiques, les pays du "Core group" qui ont invité le gouvernement à intensifier la répression.
Dans cette situation, un peuple et un pays cherchent encore leurs voies. D’un côté les multinationales, leurs courtiers, leurs interfaces locales veulent accéder à l’énorme trésor haïtien pour renforcer un pouvoir prédateur sans scrupule et sans aucun sens de solidarité avec la population. De l’autre les masses laborieuses, les ouvriers, les paysans, les catégories socioprofessionnelles et les communautés locales, lourdement affectés et pénalisés par la cherté de la vie, le chômage chronique exigent la prise en compte de leurs justes revendications en tant que forces sociales et politiques du pays.

Alors que le prix des produits de première nécessité continuent de grimper, le taux d'inflation continue de s'élever, alors que la monnaie nationale perd de la valeur par rapport au dollar américain, les dernières mesures scandaleuses comme les privilèges accordés au président, aux ministres et secrétaires d'État ont montré encore une fois la volonté du pouvoir en place de continuer à piller les caisses de la République qu'il a déjà substantiellement vidées. Le retrait de certaines mesures annoncées par le Premier ministre ne doit pas leurrer la population, ils ont tout simplement compris leur erreur en laissant transparaître leur offensive de pillage. C'est une invitation à continuer à saccager le Trésor public en catimini, en ne faisant pas bruit.
 
NON AU TRAVESTISSEMENT DU VOTE POPULAIRE;

NON AUX ARRESTATIONS, INCARCÉRATIONS, EMPRISONNEMENTS POLITIQUES;

NON AUX TUERIES, INCENDIES DE MAISONS, MASSACRES PLANIFIÉS DANS LES QUARTIERS POPULAIRES;

NON A LA REPRESSION POLITIQUE DES MOUVEMENTS SPONTANÉS DES MASSES AINSI QUE DES MILITANTS POLITIQUES;

NON À LA REPRESSION DES REVENDICATIONS LÉGITIMES DU PEUPLE

NON AU PILLAGE SYSTÉMATIQUE DES CAISSES DE LA RÉPUBLIQUE

NON AU VOL DE NOS TAXES

NON AU TRIOMPHE DU FAVORITISME DE CLANS

NON À LA TRANSFORMATION DE LA POLICE NATIONALE D’HAITI EN POLICE POLITIQUE

NON À L’IMPOSITION DE DICTATURE SOUS PRÉTEXTE DE STABILITÉ ET DE CONTINUITÉ;

NON A LA POLITIQUE DESVASTATRICE DE LA "COMMUNAUTÉ INTERNATIONALE" EN HAITI

NON À LA LIQUIDATION TOTALE DE LA SOUVERAINETÉ NATIONALE
POUR LA DÉFENSE DES ACQUIS DÉMOCRATIQUES, LE TRIOMPHE DES
REVENDICATIONS LÉGITIMES DU PEUPLE,

DE LA SOUVERAINETÉ POPULAIRE ET DE LA SOUVERAINETÉ NATIONALE.

GREVE GENERALE : Lundi, mardi, 9, 10 Novembre 2015

MARCHE CITOYENNE DU REFUS : Mercredi 11 Novembre 2015, 10 h00 AM

Parcours : De Carrefour Aéroport à Place Jérémie via Pont Morin

Nous ne voulons pas de cette continuité là !
P
eyi a p ap pran senk (5) lane ankò anba rapas sa yo !!!

Kou sa p ap pase !!!
 

Monday, September 21, 2015

Haiti: Puer Aeternus? by Edwin BCK Magloire

                                                                                     


                                                                 


 
                                                                      Haiti: Puer Aeternus? by Edwin BCK Magloire

  For most Haitians, one of the hardest things to come to terms with is the current decrepit state of the Republic of Haiti. The frustration seems to be even sharper for a member of the Diaspora or any Haitian who's had the luxury of visiting countries such as France or the good old U.S of A. I have shared this frustration for what feels like a lifetime although I've never left the island. Why can't we do better? Why is everything run like a circus? Why is mediocrity the norm? Why are we living like animals? Why can't we even realize that? These are the thoughts that countless times put me to sleep, kept me or woke me up at night. During the day, like a farm animal, I was fed the same propaganda my father and my grandfather before him were fed: "the problem? it's the whites! It's the rich! It's the voodooists! It's the poor! It's the Catholics! It's the international community! It's Haitians! But your generation will make a difference and one day Haiti will be among the great nations". And for a long while... I was naive enough to believe that. But it is this false hope that brought us this "n ap gade pou n wè" mentality. Expecting things will get fixed miraculously. We are the first independent black nation, cursed to forever wait for good days to return. We have lost our godlike ability to make days ourselves.

    But this regurgitation of manje dòmi isn't the only tool that was used to mislead me. The world, whenever it feels like stroking our ego, which turns out to be quite often, only needs to use one word: Resilience. And again, I fell for it, like all Haitians I felt proud of my ability to take shit, to have shit under my feet, sometimes to have my head under feet smeared with shit and still survive. I was taught it is a sign of strength, that there is glory in it because apparently shit is supposed to kill. This abuse of resilience is what brought us this "pito nou lèd nou la" mentality. We are slaves to these ways of thinking and we have become a people devoid of any sense of self worth. But we are so good at trying to make the shit smell good. Only few Haitians will tell you there’s something wrong with life in Haiti. Despite living in two square meter sheet metal houses, we sleep. Every day we wake up and despite our incredulity, we pray. Despite earning nickels, we spend dimes. Despite being packed like animals in public transport, we enjoy it. Despite our disdain for democracy, we organize elections. Despite our basic needs being unfulfilled, we dance. Despite cries and deaths of our brothers and sisters, we laugh. Yes... We've a special kind of resilience. The kind that turns trash into floral embellishments, malice into a quality and mental disorders into the norm. Everything is perpetually pa pi mal in Haiti.

    I am grown now, a man. Fairy tales, unless gorgeously illustrated by Chevelin Illustration, mean nothing to me. I can see through propaganda and recognize when a first world country is patronizing me. I am so demanding that even my closest friends tell me I’m never satisfied. Yes, I’d wear this shoe even if didn't fit. I hate with a passion. I love too much to not hate. Finding this newfound take on life wasn't easy though, I had to basically become smarter and wiser than I ever thought I could. It took me the internet to come across concepts such as "Respect for human dignity" and "freedom of speech"  to realize we were living like animals. I had to co found integrAction to learn the word "sustainability"  and its value and to realize Haiti as a State has weak or nonexistent institutions. It took Stéphane Hessel for me to learn that outrage needs to be acted upon. It took me the book Anti fragile, to understand that resilience should be a bridge and not a city. Because as the author Nassim Nicholas Taleb states: "Antifragility is beyond resilience. The resilient resists shocks and stays the same; the antifragile gets better.”

    I had to grow a lot before I could feel this profound disdain for everything puerile. I had to grow a lot before I could admit to myself that Haiti is not a country, just a land with people on it. She is not a virgin like our power-horny politicians always propose, she is an infant suffering from stunted and crooked growth. The worst part is it's been so long since her birth, that we are convinced of a maturity that unfortunately is nothing but an illusion. Out of roughly 200 years of history, we've only had, and I'm being generous, approximately ten years of sustainable growth. Am I exaggerating? If you take away foreign aid, the involvement of the Church in education and the personal ambitions of a few businessmen what are we left with?
I am so demanding because I see clearly now. If the hibiscus represents Haiti, the image that should be used is that of an immature flower in partial bloom, not a full blown splendid flower because that is not what we are. Until government institutions have formalized structure and job descriptions, until our schools and universities properly educate good citizens to fill these positions, until it's not a matter of who is in charge but instead what needs to be done, we will not be a country. I have swallowed enough sugar coated shit and I'm tired of being resilient.

    So do I hate Haiti now? Is it time for me to leave this sinking piece of wood that I once thought was a ship? A man of long term relationships, I always believed truth brings freedom and closeness whereas lies and sugar coating leads to separation and a dysfunctional relationship. I wouldn't wish my contact lenses on everyone because not everybody can or should have to handle how I see things but for everyone who wants to help build Haiti, this reality check is my prescription. I know for instance that my generation will not save Haiti. But the decisions I make for myself and my future family will determine whether or not it will be up to my children or my grandchildren. Can we do that? Replace false hope with realness? Replace wishful thinking with proper planning? Can we respect and love ourselves just enough to feel shame and outrage? Can we renew our vows with values? I will be more demanding with myself than everything else. Can you be demanding with yourself? Because as Jean Max Bellerive, the former president of CIRH (Commission Intérimaire pour la Reconstruction d’Haïti) said before it lamentably failed: "we have no right to fail".

To listen to the audio version (the spoken word), click on the link below:
                                                                      Haiti: Puer Aeternus?

Sunday, September 20, 2015

AT THE CROSSROAD, PAPA GHEDE GUIDES MAX G. BEAUVOIR TO GINEN

 AT THE CROSSROAD, PAPA GHEDE GUIDES MAX G. BEAUVOIR TO GINEN
by 

 Patrick Delices